Teaching

I am honored to teach the following five classes at Davidson College. Please email me if you have any questions about my classes: lastutts@davidson.edu

 

  • WRITING 101: RESILIENCY & HEALTH (Fall): This course addresses the intersection of resiliency (the ability to adapt to change) and health, primarily drawing from the fields of psychology and public health. We will investigate this topic through the discussion of empirical articles, memoirs, case studies, and videos. In addition, there are five major writing projects: 1) personal reflection on how you or someone you know experienced resilience in a health context, 2) text analysis of how resiliency concepts map onto a patient memoir, 3) argument paper about resiliency from a healthcare provider perspective, 4) research paper on a specific resilience and health topic of your choice, and 5) synthesis paper of the major themes across the course and an extension into what the field should prioritize in the future. This course counts as a first-year writing course requirement.
  • CHILD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (Fall): This course addresses the major forms of atypical development in childhood and adolescence. These include disorders of behavior, disorders of emotion, developmental and learning problems, and problems related to physical health. You will learn about the defining characteristics, associated features, possible causes, theoretical formulations, research evidence, and current approaches to prevention and intervention for a wide range of child and adolescent disorders. We will trace the possible development course of each disorder and show how biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors interact with the child’s environment to determine its expression. In addition, we will focus on diversity, inclusion, inequities, intersectionality, and ethical considerations in depth in this population. Case examples will be used to enrich your understanding of the experience of children and adolescents with psychopathology. This course counts toward the Psychology major and the Public Health minor.
  • MEDICAL REHABILITATION AND DISABILITY (Fall): This seminar addresses the conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of chronic health conditions, traumatic injuries, and disabilities. The sources include peer-reviewed articles, videos, and memoirs from the vantage point of the patient, caregiver, and healthcare provider.  In addition, we will focus on diversity, inclusion, inequities, intersectionality, and ethical considerations in depth in this population. This course is a discussion-based course that is largely meant to be student-led. This structure allows us to deeply dive into a specific topic. In addition, it provides a way for you to develop and hone skills related to oral communication, conflict resolution, organization, inclusion, and leadership. This course counts toward the Psychology major and the Public Health minor.
  • HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (Spring): This course addresses behavioral health and illness from a biopsychosocial model. This model involves treating individuals from a holistic, interdisciplinary perspective that considers the medical, psychological, social, and cultural factors that influence health. In addition, we will focus on diversity, inclusion, inequities, intersectionality, and ethical considerations in depth in health populations. Case examples will be used to enrich your understanding of the experience of health populations. This course counts toward the Psychology major and the Public Health minor.
  • NUTRITION, BODIES, & HEALTH (Spring): This seminar explores the connections between nutrition, bodies, and health from a biopsychosocial perspective and an interdisciplinary lens drawing from biology, psychology, and public health. In the first half of the course, we will discuss the assessment of nutritional diseases, contributors and causes of them, and their health, economic, stigma, and political impacts. In the second half of the course, we will evaluate interventions for nutritional diseases in the following categories: pharmacological, surgical, dietary, physical activity, Health at Every Size®, body image, underserved population, community-based, and global interventions. We will approach this topic with an appreciation of body diversity and a social justice framework of size and weight equality. In addition, we will focus on diversity, inclusion, inequities, intersectionality, and ethical considerations in depth in people with nutritional diseases. This course is a discussion-based course that is largely meant to be student-led. This structure allows us to deeply dive into a specific topic. In addition, it provides a way for you to develop and hone skills related to oral communication, conflict resolution, organization, inclusion, and leadership. This course counts toward the Psychology major, the Public Health minor, and covers the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.